Beyond Advertisement: RePinning for Safety

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As the newest team member that contributes to this blog, I join with a slightly different background. Before working with media psychology, specifically, I worked with crime victims. Needless to say, headlines like this one -

“Police reunite stolen items with owners using Pinterest”

- definitely catch my eye. The advent of law enforcement using social networking sites as an extension of enforcement efforts is not necessarily new. The emergence of Pinterest as a key player in that paradigm, however, is fascinating, to be sure.

Pinterest is an online, image driven, social networking platform boasting 70 million users (Smith, 2013). According to Cindy Tekobbe (2013), Pinterest is the fastest growing online social platform, outstripping even Facebook in its growth; its interactive design is image-driven; its membership is overwhelmingly female (87%); and member relationships are created around shared interests and images rather than personal connection.

Despite limitations for in-depth social interaction, Ottoni and colleagues (2013) determined that communication still happens in the form of likes and repins. These features are invaluable and provide a unique advantage for users – from individuals to advertisers to communities. Indeed, community leaders all over the U.S. have been using this to their benefit with local municipalities creating Pinterest pages as viable enforcement tools. With hundreds of arrests credited to civic support via Pinterest (Knell, 2013), the community safety net has been cast much wider than ever before.

References

Knell, N. (2013, January 4). Catching criminals on Pinterest? Government Technology [Online]. Retrieved from http://www.govtech.com/public-safety/Catching-Criminals-on-Pinterest.html

Ottoni, R., Pesce, J. P. Las Casa, D., Franciscani Jr., G., Meira, Jr., W., Kumaraguru, P., & Almeida, V. (2013, July). Ladies first: Analyzing gender roles and behavior in Pinterest. Paper presented at the 7th Annual International AAAI Conference on Weblogs and Social Media (ICWSM), Boston, USA.

Smith, C. (2013, August 5). How many people use the top social media, apps, and services? DMR: Digital Marketing Ramblings. Retrieved from  http://expandedramblings.com/index.php/resource-how-many-people-use-the-top-    social-media/

Tekobbe, C. K. (2013). A site for fresh eyes.   Information, Communication & Society, 16(3), 381-396. DOI: 10.1080/1369118X.2012.756052

Psychology and Advertising

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“Psychology has been at the heart of advertising since its invention, although, academically, advertising and psychology have long since gone their separate ways. For advertisers, the ability to manipulate consumer impressions and decision making has been the key to success. If product sales increase following a carefully orchestrated campaign, the persuasive tactics have evidently worked, although as with any natural experiment it is hard to establish cause and effect due to the lack of control over confounding variables” (Giles, p. 106).

 References

Giles, D., 2003. Media Psychology. Mahwah: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Media Psychology and Transmedia Storytelling Case Study: The Power Inside

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‘The Power Inside’ is the third social film in a series created by Pereria & O’Dell for Toshiba and Intel. The series, which launched in 2011 with the film ‘Inside’, has been proclaimed as ‘groundbreaking’ by Fast Company and won multiple awards.

This third installment launched August 15, 2013 with a six episode web series featuring a strong ensemble cast including Harvey Keitel. The campaign was aimed at tech-savvy MillenTrnials and was hoping to promote Toshiba laptops that housed the Intel Core 15 Processor. Campaign assets included six ten minute webisodes featured on a sleek website, an active Facebook page, a Twitter feed and a YouTube channel.
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Repurposing Classic Soviet Propaganda Imagery for the Moscow Olympics

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The Moscow Olympics, like so many before it, provides the opportunity for political statements to be made, this time one focusing on Russia’s stance against members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) communities (Reuters, 2013). One voice against this discrimination is an artist who uses classic Soviet propaganda images and gives them new life and meaning. Posting the work on Tumbler.com, a microblogging and social networking site owned by Yahoo, #PridePropaganda has redefined an array of images using the colors of the rainbow which can often be seen in other LGBT support events. A comparison can be seen below.
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Zuckerberg’s Dream of Connecting the World: What Can We Expect? (Part 5 – Implications)

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Recapping the previous four posts on this topic, Mark Zuckerberg’s new non-profit consortium of information and communication technology (ICT) corporations would like to connect the remaining 5 billion inhabitants of the planet to the Internet who are not now connected (Internet.org, 2013). This post examines the implications of what the  studies conducted on a reduced scale involving the distribution of laptops in Ethiopia found.

What has been established is that when Western ICT is available on a daily, long term basis to an individual who lives in a third-world, collectivistic environment the ICT does cause change in individual self-construal, fosters the growth of individualistic, modern and agentic values, and increases levels of abstract reasoning among children. Although, these changes are individually significant, it does not immediately alter the individual’s culture and they are, from what appears to date, subsumed into the culture’s uniqueness (Hansen & Postmes, 2013; Hansen & Postmes, 2013; Hansen, Postmes, van der Vinne, & van Thiel, 2012; Kocsev, Hansen, Hollow, & Pischetola, 2009).
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Zuckerberg’s Dream of Connecting the World: What Can We Expect? (Part 4 – The Findings)

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Recapping the previous posts on this topic, Mark Zuckerberg’s new non-profit consortium of information and communication technology (ICT) corporations would like to connect the remaining 5 billion inhabitants of the planet to the Internet who are not now connected (Internet.org, 2013). Many of the five billion people in question will most likely come from collectivistic non-western cultures. This post examines the results of studies conducted on a reduced scale involving the distribution of laptops in Ethiopia during which the researchers claim to have found the “first systematic evidence that usage of Western ICT can instigate cultural change in a traditional developing country” (Hansen N. , Postmes, van der Vinne, & van Thiel, 2012, p. 230).
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Advertising as Economic Propaganda

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“Public relations is … a communicative process designed to enhance the relationship between the organization and the public and, as such, is a branch of propaganda…. Propaganda is here defined as a deliberate attempt to persuade people, by any available media, to think and then behave in a manner desired by the source, it is really a means to an end” (Taylor, 2003, pp. 6-7).

References

Taylor, P. M. (2003). Munitions of the Mind. Manchester: Manchester University Press.

Zuckerberg’s Dream of Connecting the World: What Can We Expect? (Part 3)

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Recapping the earlier posts on this topic, Mark Zuckerberg’s new non-profit consortium of information and communication technology (ICT) corporations would like to connect the remaining 5 billion inhabitants of the planet to the Internet who are not now connected (Internet.org, 2013). Many of the five billion people in question will most likely come from collectivistic non-western cultures. What effects can we expect?

As connecting the world’s populations has never been attempted before, literature focusing on the potential effects is non-existent. As a result, a reduced scale of the effort can be examined in regard to the insertion of Western ICT into countries that have not been previously exposed to it en masse or subject to its effects.

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Quote

Ian Bogost – The Georgia Institute of Technology

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“…the result of any media experience throughout history has been a change in the reader, viewer, or interactor’s ideas and actions in the world, even if in subtle ways” (Bogost, 2008, p. 16).

References

Bogost, I. (2008). Fine Processing. Persuasive Technology (pp. 13-22). Oulu: Springer.

Marshall McLuhan & the Print-to-Digital Shift Which Undermines Nationalism

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Ken S. Heller:

Here’s an interesting snippet discussing Marshall McLuhan’s theories and how media may lead to the end of nationalism due to a change in the linearity of human relationships and experience. It’s part of a larger post authored by Mark Bou Mansour at Catch21. Food for thought.

Originally posted on McLuhan Galaxy:

Published on November 25th, 2013

by Mark Bou Mansour

Do new media technologies just carry on the developments of print media? Or are new currents underway today? Marshal McLuhan argues the latter. McLuhan was a Canadian philosopher, media guru and intellectual celebrity ….  McLuhan is known for coining the phrase “the medium is the message”, popularizing the notion of “the global village”, and for pretty much revolutionizing the way we look at media’s role in shaping human societies. McLuhan, who is credited with quotes such as “diaper spelled backwards is repaid. Think about it” and “I don’t necessarily agree with everything I say”, is also credited with predicting the internet thirty years before its commercialization.

In his game-changing book The Gutenberg Galaxy: The Making of Typographic Man, which we don’t have space be give justice here, McLuhan studies the way technology for documenting and communicating has influenced human cognition and…

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